Modern Classics: The Next Generation of Classical Composers

Modern Classics: The Next Generation of Classical Composers

In the classical music world, we often neglect the modern in favor of the past, not because of any inherent prejudice, it’s just human nature. For example, most people can recognize Beethoven or Mozart, but the nearer to the present, the lesser known the composer. In order for the art form to survive it’s in the best interests of the classical music community to listen to and support contemporary composers. That’s why we’re showcasing two major new works which have…

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Holy Week in Firenze

Holy Week in Firenze

Florence, Italy, boasts a number of beautiful churches and basilicas, but none more magnificent than the Great Basilica di Santa Croce. We have been fortunate enough to arrange a special sacred music program in this ancient church in the middle of Holy Week this April. Led by conductor Peter Tiboris, the Vintage High School Choir from Napa, California, and the Coro del Liceo will perform a selection of sacred music including Mozart’s Ergo Interest, K.143/73a and Fauré’s Requiem. The choirs…

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Quiz: Which Famous Requiem is Your Favorite?

Quiz: Which Famous Requiem is Your Favorite?

Text Reads: The requiem mass has been a time-honored form for centuries. Many of the most celebrated composers have chosen to write a requiem that suits them stylistically. The question is… which one is your favorite? — Related: Celebrating Fauré’s Requiem on its 130th Anniversary — — Related: Modern Classics: John Rutter’s Requiem — — Related: Mozart: Requiem for a Prodigy —

Modern Classics: John Rutter’s Requiem

Modern Classics: John Rutter’s Requiem

John Rutter’s Requiem, composed in 1985, has become a fixture of choral repertoire all over the world. Often compared to Fauré’s Requiem, it subtly walks the line between modern style and a romantic affinity for melody that is characteristic of Rutter’s music. Like Faure’s, Rutter’s Requiem is more poignant than morose, yet still profoundly moving. Although there are many similarities between the two works, Rutter drew on his personal heritage to make the Requiem his own. John Rutter was born…

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Ron Jones on Performing in Carnegie Hall

Ron Jones on Performing in Carnegie Hall

Being able to perform in Carnegie Hall is the dream of many young musicians all over the world, but actually taking the stage can be a nerve-wracking experience no matter your age. This feeling is well known to conductor Ron Jones of Port Angeles, Washington. On April 6, 2017, Jones conducted in Carnegie Hall as part of MidAmerica Production’s 34th concert season; this concert is just the latest of several previous appearances with MidAmerica Productions dating back to 1989. We…

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10 Facts about Academy Award Winning Music

10 Facts about Academy Award Winning Music

1. Dmitri Shostakovich and Duke Ellington were both nominated the same year but lost to the arrangers of West Side Story. Both musicians were nominated for Best Score of a Musical Picture in 1961, at the height of their careers, but their scores were beaten out by the enormously popular hit musical West Side Story.   2. John Williams has more Oscar nominations than just about anyone. So far Williams has won five Oscars, but, more impressively, he’s been nominated…

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Music and the Presidents

Music and the Presidents

On Presidents Day, we celebrate the birthdays of two of the most significant American presidents – George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. What many people don’t know is that music, especially the music of their day, was a central passion of their lives. General Washington’s Army Band   Before serving our nation as its first president, George Washington, one of the great revolutionary generals, had already developed a keen interest in music. During the Revolution, he sent orders to his troops…

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Sing Handel’s Messiah in Carnegie Hall this Thanksgiving

Sing Handel’s Messiah in Carnegie Hall this Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving may be months away, but it’s never too early to plan a trip to New York City where you can see the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and sing the world’s most famous choral piece in Carnegie Hall. This November 28, 2017, conductor Jonathan Willcocks will be leading the first Carnegie Hall performance of Handel’s Messiah of the 2017 Christmas season. Open to all choirs throughout the United States and Canada, this concert is an opportunity to perform in the…

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Thompson’s Frostiana: Seven Country Songs

Thompson’s Frostiana: Seven Country Songs

Robert Frost is undoubtedly one of the best known American poets. Although his work is memorable in and of itself, it has also found life outside of poetry as the source of lyrics for Randall Thompson’s Frostiana: Seven Country Songs. Frost’s simple vernacular style and depth of meaning make his poems uniquely suited for singing, a fact that did not escape Thompson in his composition. The piece was commissioned in 1959 by the town of Amherst, Massachusetts, where Frost taught…

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Zoe Zeniodi to Conduct Beethoven in Carnegie Hall this April

Zoe Zeniodi to Conduct Beethoven in Carnegie Hall this April

Rising star Zoe Zeniodi is due to appear this April in Carnegie Hall where she will be conducting the overture to Beethoven’s Fidelio as well as his Symphony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93. Despite her young age, she has already proven herself a talent-to-watch and made a name for herself as a skilled leader and artistic director. Zoe Zeniodi, Award-winning Pianist and Conductor Zeniodi earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Piano Performance and Accompaniment from the Royal College of…

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